CURRENT SHOWCASE EXHIBITIONS

July 3, 2021 2:30 pm - August 28, 2021 4:00 pm Malcolm Smith Gallery

Awards Ceremony
Saturday 3 July, 2:30PM 2021
Exhibition
Saturday 3 July – 28 August 2021

The only contemporary art award in Aotearoa New Zealand with ecology at its core.

Artists have been invited to research and respond to the Tāmaki estuary – to underscore the ecological value of this vital waterway, and to encourage action against its pollution.

UXBRIDGE is pleased to welcome the Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum as partner and sponsor for this year’s event. The prize pool is now $10,000. Our judge, Francis McWhannell, has selected 23 artworks for the 15th Estuary Art and Ecology Award based on their innovative and intelligent response to ecology and the Tāmaki Estuary. He has also selected a number of other entries for display outside the main gallery. These entries will also be open for the Rice Family Partnership’s People’s Award.

2021 Finalists

  • Mā Te Huruhuru Artists      (First Prize)
  • Katie Theunissen                  (Second Prize)
  • Divyaa Kumar                       (Third Prize)
  • Jenny Tomlin                         (Merit)
  • Franca Bertani                      (Merit)
  • Kiri Abraham
  • Ina Arraoui
  • Gail Barratt
  • Emily Brown
  • Guinevere Cherrill
  • Julie Christey
  • Karen Danes
  • Matt Dowman
  • Emma Fromont
  • Dani Henke
  • Amanda Hewlett
  • Jen Huebert
  • Kim Logue
  • Minke Lupa
  • TSU
  • Marion Wassenaar
  • Alby Yap
  • Isabella Young


Concourse Exhibition

  • Anna Gibbs
  • Deborah Hide-Bayne
  • Maria Lambert
  • Janet Mazenier
  • Marie-Louise Myburgh
  • Penny Otto
  • Celeste Sterling
  • Celia Walker
  • Amanda Watson-Green
  • Alvin Xiong
  • Nuanzhi Zheng

Signature Image: Confluence – 2020 Estuary Art Awards (Merit)

Cathy Tuato’o Ross, Bindy Caesar, Penny Fitt, Heather Hunt, Richard Hunter, Julia Newland

We have selected this image for the 2021 Estuary Art Awards as it is the result of a creative collaboration and is a conscious response to the dilemma of the Tāmaki Estuary’s past, present, and future. It involved conversation, negotiation, learning, and incorporates knowledge of place with knowledge of colonial history and the effects of human activity on the land, the water, and the climate. Restoring, preserving, and respecting the ecology of Tāmaki Estuary is an ongoing project that will require conversations, listening, negotiation, and collaborative action across the different perspectives of all those affected – a confluence.